Cycles, Cultural Entropy and Faith

The historic course of all civilisations is cyclic in nature. Over a period of three to four hundred years on average all of them return to a similar common starting point, a point always defined by a darkness of the collective soul and a loss of moral fortitude. It is there and then that an inevitable movement for a return to old ways and meanings begins to form.

Imagine if you will a civilisation’s chronological pendulum completing a vertical ellipse rather than just an arc at the bottom. At the superior apogee, twelve Noon in the cycle, the pendulum almost pauses at a point of stability before beginning its inevitable descent, accelerating slowly at first, even imperceptibly, but ever faster as the gravity of cultural entropy increases its velocity until it approaches the inferior apogee, Midnight, where then it begins its at first rapid but ever slowing climb back into the light. Continue reading Cycles, Cultural Entropy and Faith

In Defence of the New Knighthood

This is intended somewhat as an addendum to the previous post, Meditating on Death, one with a distinctly medieval Catholic perspective. What follows below is an excerpt from a letter written by a Cistercian Abbot, Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, to Hugh de Payens, founder and first Master of the Knights Templar.

It was written in the early 12th century, some time after the founding of the Order and is set against the backdrop of violent Islamic incursion into Western lands and the defence of Holy Europe by Christian military orders, most of which began as small, independent warrior fraternities long before they received royal and Papal recognition. Continue reading In Defence of the New Knighthood

Meditating on Death

As I write this the sky is a flat grey. The last storm has cleared but the midday sun shines weaker and hangs lower every day. The nights are longer and colder. The new life of spring is still months away. Those who have worked hard and prepared themselves will survive to see it. The idle will be carried to their graves. There are few better analogies for the state of the Occident than winter.

Winter is a fitting moment to ponder our own mortality, but meditating on death is something we should do routinely, and incorporate into the rituals of the small and independent Reactionary brotherhoods we are forming. Continue reading Meditating on Death

Reaction to the Paris Attacks

The reaction to the latest Islamic terrorist attack in Paris has been utterly predictable. Politicians calling for unity and the unbreakable spirit of democracy. People castigating religion. Almost everybody missing the point, although some are slowly beginning to get it.

It’s clear now that Europe is now facing a series of converging crises: financial collapse, the struggle to meet energy demands, a corruption of morals, Islamic terrorism, a declining native population and a foreign invasion. These crises are now coming into focus so sharply as to be impossible to ignore. This is the shock of history that Dominique Venner predicted. Continue reading Reaction to the Paris Attacks

The Solution We Do Not Want

The natural world is one of balance. When equilibrium is disturbed Nature takes corrective action to restore balance. Le Châtelier’s Principle states that when a system in equilibrium is subjected to a stress, the system will adjust in order to counteract that stress and a new equilibrium is achieved. Le Châtelier was concerned with chemistry, but his principle translates to a wider array of systems. Continue reading The Solution We Do Not Want

The Shock of History by Dominique Venner

Arktos have recently published an English translation of Dominique Venner’s The Shock of History. Dominique Venner was a prolific writer and historian but so far little of his work has been translated into English aside from a few tantalising snippets and quotes.

Before he was a writer Venner was a soldier and political activist. He served as a paratrooper, fighting on the French loyalist side in the vicious Algerian war. Then he was a member of the dissident far-right paramilitary Organisation of the Secret Army which tried to overthrow the de Gaulle government. Continue reading The Shock of History by Dominique Venner

Sleeping Kings and the War Christ

The modern Christian, with his universalist attitude is surprised to find himself under constant attack by the de-civilisational and degenerate. He cries and cries, but refuses to do anything, inviting only further attacks. Like the cuckservative, he abandons principles and finds himself with barely any religion left at all. He opened the doors of his church to everyone, and wonders why the pews are empty. Who wants to join a club that anybody can wander into? What man would want to join a tattered church that is bullied by effeminate homosexuals and doesn’t fight back?

Modern, oriental Christianity has mutated into a culture of weakness and victimhood. It teaches rights, but not responsibilities. It teaches an abdication of duty. Above all it has taught the European man to surrender, and in disgust at this the European man has deserted the church. Continue reading Sleeping Kings and the War Christ

Spanish Mission

This post will be of particular interest to our readers in Spain, of which I know we have many, but should also interest adventurous readers in Europe and those Europeans around the world who may be eyeing a return to their ancient homeland in time for the coming battle. A unique opportunity has arisen for those willing to seize it.

There is an abandoned hamlet called A Barca in the northwestern Spanish province of Galicia. It’s one of many in this part of Spain. Rural Galicia is beautiful, close to the Atlantic Ocean and the border with Portugal. It’s hilly and densely forested and marked by rivers and cliffs and canyons. Real rebel country. It’s also of cultural significance to us as it was once part of the medieval Christian kingdom of Asturias, where Pelagius won the battle of Covadonga and began the Reconquista which drove the Caliphate from Iberia. Continue reading Spanish Mission

De-Programming Modernism

We revolt against the modern world but we are still contaminated by it. We were born into, educated by it, and must live and work within it to some degree. We recognise modernity as the problem but we are still surrounded by it and allow it space inside our heads. We are still plagued by modern ways of thinking that go against our European ethos. Our inability to solve modern problems is in part due to our inability to think outside of the modern world and the palatable options it presents to us. We need a return to the ancient, noble and heroic instead of the modern and prosaic. Continue reading De-Programming Modernism

Decline of Europe: Afghanistan Model

I’ve lived and worked in Afghanistan for eights years. I’ve watched the results of ethnic chaos and diversity and the way parallel power structures emerge in the wake of a weakening nation-state. There is much happening in Afghanistan that could show a possible future of Europe if it continues on its current trajectory. Living and surviving here has given me more than a few ideas about how to survive what is coming to Europe. Continue reading Decline of Europe: Afghanistan Model